Joseph Series: Conquering Temptation (Gen 39)

March 16, 2019

 

Conquering Temptation

 

Now Joseph had been brought down to Egypt. An Egyptian named Potiphar, an official of Pharaoh and the captain of the guard, purchased him from the Ishmaelites who had brought him there. The Lord was with Joseph. He was successful and lived in the household of his Egyptian master. His master observed that the Lord was with him and that the Lord made everything he was doing successful. So Joseph found favor in his sight and became his personal attendant. Potiphar appointed Joseph overseer of his household and put him in charge of everything he owned. From the time Potiphar appointed him over his household and over all that he owned, the Lord blessed the Egyptian’s household for Joseph’s sake. The blessing of the Lord was on everything that he had, both in his house and in his fields. So Potiphar left everything he had in Joseph’s care; he gave no thought to anything except the food he ate. Now Joseph was well built and good-looking. Soon after these things, his master’s wife took notice of Joseph and said, “Have sex with me.” But he refused, saying to his master’s wife, “Look, my master does not give any thought to his household with me here, and everything that he owns he has put into my care. There is no one greater in this household than I am. He has withheld nothing from me except you because you are his wife. So how could I do such a great evil and sin against God?” Even though she continued to speak to Joseph day after day, he did not respond to her invitation to have sex with her. One day he went into the house to do his work when none of the household servants were there in the house. She grabbed him by his outer garment, saying, “Have sex with me!” But he left his outer garment in her hand and ran outside…

Genesis 39

 

 

How can we conquer temptations?

 

No matter, who we are or where we’re from, we will encounter temptations. Adam and Eve were tempted in the garden. Israel was tempted in the wilderness. Christ was tempted, and we’ll be tempted as well. First Corinthians 10:13 implies that we all will experience temptation and, at the same time, be provided a way of escape by God. It says, “No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.” We’ll all experience temptation, the only question is, “How will we respond to it?”

 

In this section of Joseph’s narrative, he experiences major temptations: He was tempted to be upset and bitter at his circumstance of being sold into slavery. When he became successful, no doubt, he experienced temptations towards pride and independence of God. He experienced sexual temptation from his master’s wife, which is the major temptation in this narrative. After being wrongly imprisoned, no doubt, he again was tempted towards hopelessness and despair. In all these temptations, God was faithful to provide ways of escape, and it’s the same for us.

 

Unlike the previous narrative where we learned from the failures of Joseph’s family (Gen 37), in this narrative, we will learn from Joseph’s success in conquering temptation.

 

Big Question: What principles can we learn about conquering temptation from Joseph’s responses to various temptations in this narrative?

 

To Conquer Temptation, We Must Submit to God’s Discipline Instead of Becoming Bitter at It

 

Now Joseph had been brought down to Egypt. An Egyptian named Potiphar, an official of Pharaoh and the captain of the guard, purchased him from the Ishmaelites who had brought him there. The LORD was with Joseph. He was successful and lived in the household of his Egyptian master. His master observed that the LORD was with him and that the LORD made everything he was doing successful.

Genesis 39:1-3

 

When Joseph is taken by slave traders to Egypt, he is purchased by a high official in Pharaoh’s court named Potiphar. His name meant “devoted to the sun,” which demonstrated his pagan, religious background.[1] He was captain of Pharaoh’s bodyguard, which was a prestigious position. Historical documents tell us that the bodyguards were Pharaoh’s executioners. They not only protected Pharaoh, but when he was upset with somebody, they executed the person. Therefore, Potiphar was Pharaoh’s chief executioner.[2] No doubt, he had a very decorated military resume and was a rough, no-nonsense guy.

 

For Joseph, it was probably initially intimidating working for him. If he failed him in any way, he might have been put in prison or even worse, executed. However, what we see is that God was with Joseph. Eight times, Yahweh is mentioned in this chapter. Yahweh is only mentioned one other time in the rest of Genesis[3], which shows how active God was in this part of Joseph’s life. When things were bad, God moved in a special way in Joseph’s life, even if he was unaware of it.

 

With that said, Joseph’s example also teaches a principle specifically about how to go through trials and temptations. When people go through trials, one of the temptations is to become bitter, turn away from God and others. Instead of being bitter and upset, Joseph submitted to God in the midst of his trial and trusted him. We can discern this by two things: (1) If he was bitter about his family, bitter about being enslaved, and mad at God, it would have negatively affected his attitude while working, which would have kept him from being so quickly promoted. (Nobody promotes a bitter, whiny, solemn person! He or she hurts the workplace instead of making it more productive.) (2) Also, if Joseph was bitter, instead of experiencing God’s blessings, he would have experienced God’s discipline. First Corinthians 10:9-10 warns us about complaining like Israel in the wilderness because if we do, God will discipline us. It says, “We must not put Christ to the test, as some of them did and were destroyed by serpents, nor grumble, as some of them did and were destroyed by the Destroyer.”

 

This is where many succumb to temptation. When they go through hard times with family, work, school, or other relationships, they become bitter and constantly complain. By complaining instead of praising God, they are really saying that they don’t trust God, that he is not in control, or that he doesn’t know what he is doing. That’s what Israel did—causing them to miss God’s blessing in their trial and instead experience his wrath.

 

Many fail to submit to God in the midst of their trials and temptations and instead succumb to them. They commonly hold anger and bitterness for years after some traumatic event: They are angry at parents, angry at the school system or government, angry at someone who harmed them. It is clear that Joseph trusted God not only by how he blesses his brothers when he is later exalted (Gen 50) but by God's favor and blessing over him throughout his time in Egypt. Joseph had previously foreseen God using the bad for good in his dreams (Gen 37) and he believed them. He didn’t know how. But God was going to exalt him, and his family would bow to him.

 

We may not have clear, predictive dreams from God, but we do have a clearer word than Joseph. God is working all things for our good and to make us into the image of his Son (Rom 8:28-29). We are called to let perseverance finish its work so that we may be mature and complete, not lacking anything (Jam 1:4). Also, Hebrews 12:5b-7 and 11 says,

 

“My son, do not scorn the Lord’s discipline or give up when he corrects you. For the Lord disciplines the one he loves and chastises every son he accepts.” Endure hardship as discipline; God is treating you as his children… No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.

 

The writer of Hebrews warns against scorning or becoming upset at God’s discipline. He defines God’s discipline as hardship. He doesn’t even qualify whether the “hardship” is from the devil, humans, or God. Therefore, we should consider all hardship as under the sovereign hand of God—used to train us. It is meant to develop righteousness in us and give us more peace, regardless of our circumstances. It is meant to mature us for our calling, as James said, and that’s exactly what God was doing with Joseph.

 

During this trial, he was learning humility, as he no longer was the favored son—he was now a slave. He was learning administration skills, as he led all of Potiphar’s household. This was preparing him to lead all of Egypt. He learned the Egyptian language and customs. All of this was a form of boot camp. Because Joseph submitted to God in the test and trusted God’s promises to him, he received God’s blessing. He was exalted in Potiphar’s house, and even when he becomes a prisoner, he was exalted again. As Joseph submitted to God in the trial, God was with him to bless and not to discipline.

 

To congregations struggling with persecution, Peter said this: “Humble yourselves, therefore, under God’s mighty hand, that he may lift you up in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you” (1 Pet 5:6-7). If we humble ourselves before God in our trials and temptations, he will lift us up as well.

 

Are you submitting to God’s discipline? One of the best ways to do this is by “giving thanks in all circumstances (including bad ones) for this is God’s will for our lives” (1 Thess 5:18; cf. Phil 4:6-7). Are you giving thanks or becoming bitter? Do you realize your trials and temptations are just ways God is preparing you for more? What Satan means for bad, God is going to use for your good (cf. Gen 50:20).

 

Application Question: Why is it important to see God as sovereign over trials and temptations in order to be faithful in them (cf. 1 Cor 10:13, Jam 1:3-4, Heb 12:7)? How has God used seemingly bad things—like trials and temptations—for your good?

 

To Conquer Temptation, We Must Practice Integrity in All Areas of Life

 

So Joseph found favor in his sight and became his personal attendant. Potiphar appointed Joseph overseer of his household and put him in charge of everything he owned. From the time Potiphar appointed him over his household and over all that he owned, the Lord blessed the Egyptian’s household for Joseph’s sake. The blessing of the Lord was on everything that he had, both in his house and in his fields. So Potiphar left everything he had in Joseph’s care; he gave no thought to anything except the food he ate.

Genesis 39:4-6

 

Another principle about conquering temptation we can discern is the need to practice integrity in all areas of life. The text says that Potiphar put him in charge of everything he owned. This is repeated four times in verse 4 to 6 for emphasis. It implies that Joseph had shown himself trustworthy, and therefore, Potiphar didn’t have to worry about anything. Joseph’s integrity was impeccable in all areas—not just when it came to sexual purity.

 

This is a reason many people fall when temptation comes. If Joseph had been cheating in business matters: stealing money from Potiphar or lying about certain things under his care, it would have been a lot easier to have an affair with Mrs. Potiphar. It’s a very basic principle, which the New Testament teaches as well: “The one who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and the one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much” (Lk 16:10).

 

Often Christians compartmentalize their life: certain deceptions are OK, and others are not. It’s OK to cheat on a test—everybody else is doing it, they say. It’s OK to illegally download—the product shouldn’t cost that much anyways. It’s OK to cheat on taxes—the government is taking too much money as it is. When Christians do this, they are preparing themselves to be unfaithful in other areas of their life.

 

But this wasn’t true of Joseph. His integrity was preparing him for further exaltation—to second in command over Egypt. He was faithful with little—Potiphar’s house—therefore, it was easier to stand when tempted by his wife. Also, it would be easier for him to stand when other major temptations would come while he oversaw matters Egypt.

 

How is your integrity? Are you preparing to conquer temptation by having integrity in all things or preparing to succumb to future temptations by small compromises?

 

Application Question: Why is it important to practice integrity in little things to protect us from stumbling in bigger things? Why it is so easy to compartmentalize—to say something like being unfaithful in schoolwork or taxes won’t affect my faithfulness in bigger things, like marriage?

 

To Conquer Temptation, We Must Especially Guard Ourselves in Times of Success

 

Now Joseph was well built and good-looking. Soon after these things, his master’s wife took notice of Joseph and said, “Have sex with me.”

Genesis 39:6b-7

 

Joseph was good looking. He was one of four guys the Bible says this about including Saul, David, and Absalom. However, though Joseph was good looking, Potiphar’s wife didn’t notice him until he was exalted. The narrator said, “Soon after these things” (v. 7). It was when Joseph was successful that he experienced greater temptations.

 

Thomas Carlyle, a Scottish historian, once wrote, “Adversity is hard on a man; but for one man who can stand prosperity, there are a hundred that will stand adversity.”[4]

 

Charles Swindoll said something similar:

 

Few people can live in the lap of luxury and maintain their spiritual, emotional, and moral equilibrium. Sudden elevation often disturbs balance, which leads to pride and a sense of self-sufficiency—and then, a fall. It’s ironic, but more of us can hang tough through a demotion than through a promotion. And it is at this level a godly leader shows himself or herself strong. The right kind of leaders, when promoted, know how to handle the honor.[5]

 

Promotion and success open doors to more temptation: The more successful someone is, the less they have people looking over their shoulders; the more freedoms and perks they receive, and the more temptation they experience to abuse their power. How commonly do we see successful pastors, athletes, businessmen, or government officials fall? With success, comes more temptations, and therefore we must be even more disciplined if God allows those opportunities. David fell while successful, Solomon fell, and many others have as well.

 

When successful, we’ll need greater accountability—people to speak into our lives and hold us accountable. We’ll need to be more transparent, as a means of protection. We’ll need to be more disciplined with our time and money. We’ll need to guard our family more—greater responsibility means we’ll have to say, “No,” more to spend time with our family. If we are going to conquer temptation, we must especially guard ourselves in times of promotion or success.

 

Application Question: In what ways have you seen people change negatively when they gain success or are put into authority positions? What types of disciplines are necessary to protect someone in seasons of promotion and exaltation?

 

To Conquer Temptation, We Must Consider the Consequences

 

But he refused, saying to his master’s wife, “Look, my master does not give any thought to his household with me here, and everything that he owns he has put into my care. There is no one greater in this household than I am. He has withheld nothing from me except you because you are his wife. So how could I do such a great evil and sin against God?”

Genesis 39:8-9

 

When Potiphar’s wife asked Joseph to sleep with her, he refused and gave two reasons for doing so: First, he talked about how his master trusted him and favored him and also how it would be a sin against God.

 

This is a discipline that we must always practice when tempted. We must seriously consider the consequences. Sin drastically affects us and others. Solomon said this to his son about avoiding the temptation of adultery:

 

Can a man hold fire against his chest without burning his clothes? Can a man walk on hot coals without scorching his feet? So it is with the one who has sex with his neighbor’s wife; no one who touches her will escape punishment… A man who commits adultery with a woman lacks wisdom, whoever does it destroys his own life. He will be beaten and despised, and his reproach will not be wiped away;

Proverbs 6:27-29, 32-33

 

When considering adultery, Solomon said the consequences last forever—the reproach will never be wiped away. We must remember that Satan comes to steal, kill, and destroy (John 10:10). Sin is not the end game of temptation—destruction is. It is good for us to think deeply about the potential consequences—considering how our sins affect ourselves, friends, family, other Christians, and non-believers. Personally, I always think about how spiritual failure would negatively affect my daughter for the rest of her life. It would devastate my wife. Some members of my church might never return to church again. Others might turn away from Christ altogether. Considering the consequences of our sin is a wise practice.

 

Most importantly, like Joseph, we must remember how much participating in sin will hurt God. Ultimately, all sin is against God. For some, this reality might not mean much, but the more we get to know God and his grace, the more sinning against him will deter us. Spurgeon said this:

 

“When I regarded God as a tyrant, I thought sin a trifle; but when I knew him to be my father, then I mourned that I could ever have kicked against him. When I thought that God was hard, I found it easy to sin; but when I found God so kind, so good, so overflowing with compassion, I smote upon my breast to think that I could ever have rebelled against one who loved me so, and sought my good.”[6]

 

Titus said this, “For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation to all people. It trains us to reject godless ways and worldly desires and to live self-controlled, upright, and godly lives in the present age” (2:11-12). The more we know God and his grace, the more it will help us reject godless ways and worldly desires. We don’t want to grieve God’s heart; we don’t want to lose his favor and empowerment to serve others. The cost of sin is too much. Thinking of its consequences will help us stand against temptation.

 

Application Question: When tempted, how often do you consider the consequences of sin? Why is this such an important discipline?

 

To Conquer Temptation, We Must Recognize How Evil It Is

 

So how could I do such a great evil and sin against God?”

Genesis 39:9b

 

When invited by Mrs. Potiphar into an adulterous relationship, Joseph called it a “great evil and sin against God” (v. 9b)? In the pagan world, adultery was normal. The husbands had concubines or mistresses, especially if they were wealthy. Having a wife was primarily for providing an heir and to oversee the household. Marriage was not about love and monogamy. Wives often were lonely, and some sought the love they lacked from outside of the marriage. Egyptian women in the ancient world were especially known for immorality and loose morals (even married women).[7] Mrs. Potiphar probably said, “There is nothing wrong with this! It’s normal. You’re a handsome guy! I’m a great-looking older woman! It will be fun! Plus, my husband has many other women! What’s the big deal?!”

 

This is exactly how the world and Satan promote sin: It is not a great evil! Promiscuity is natural. We’re creatures with needs—sleep, food, sex. It’s not normal to forbid yourself these basic needs. Homosexuality is not an abomination like Scripture says. It’s an alternate lifestyle. It’s meant to be celebrated! Getting angry is just self-expression—sharing what’s on one’s mind! You can’t hold it in. That would suppress who you really are! Let it out! You can even get angry at God! However, Christ says to be angry is morally equivalent to murder (Matt 5:21-22)! Sometimes, the evilness of sin is lowered by calling it a disease. “Oh, getting drunk and abusing your wife, that’s not your fault! You have a disease! It’s OK!” This is one of the ways Satan makes evil attractive—he rebrands it, like a great businessman.

 

This is the very reason many people can’t get free from sin; they simply don’t see it as that bad. If one doesn’t recognize how heinous something is, he or she won’t desperately work to get rid of it. If we don’t hate it, then it will linger in our lives.

 

Application Question: In what ways does the world and Satan aim to make sin more acceptable and less heinous? How should Christians overcome this reprogramming? 

 

To Conquer Temptation, We Must Avoid It Persistently

 

Even though she continued to speak to Joseph day after day, he did not respond to her invitation to have sex with her. One day he went into the house to do his work when none of the household servants were there in the house. She grabbed him by his outer garment, saying, “Have sex with me!” But he left his outer garment in her hand and ran outside.

Genesis 39:10-12

 

After Joseph rejected Potiphar’s wife, she didn’t stop pursuing him. It says she spoke to him “day after day” (v. 10). No doubt, she not only spoke but tried to tempt him by the clothing and perfume she put on. Obviously, Potiphar’s wife wasn’t used to be rejected and wouldn’t take no for an answer. To fight the temptation, Joseph not only refused but also stop being around her. Verse 10 in the NIV says, “he refused to go to bed with her or even be with her.” Whenever Joseph saw Mrs. Potiphar, he simply went the other direction. He didn’t look at her or even listen to her. Eventually, she became so desperate that on a day none of the other servants were around (a possible setup), she grabbed Joseph and tried to force him to sleep with her. Joseph ran away—leaving his outer garment in her hand.

 

Similarly, if we are going to conquer temptation, we must avoid it persistently as well. First Thessalonians 5:22 says, “Stay away from every form of evil.” Christ taught if our eye offends us to pluck it out, if our hand offends us to cut it off, and if our foot offends us to do the same (Matt 5:29-30, Matt 18:8-9). Essentially, he taught we need to be drastic in order to be holy. If it means to start avoiding a certain person or group of people, so be it. If it means getting rid of the TV or cutting off the Wi-Fi in the house, so be it. We must do whatever it takes to be holy. We are not to entertain sin through the radio or TV and declare how strong we are—how it doesn’t affect us. We are called to flee it, like Joseph. Kent Hughes said, “The word is out … God is looking for a few good ‘cowards’!”[8] The rest of Scripture supports this: Second Timothy 2:22 (NIV) says, “Flee the evil desires of youth…” First Corinthians 6:18 says, “Flee sexual immorality…”

 

It’s the strong who are weak and the weak who are strong. Some believers are just too strong to conquer temptations. If they were weaker, willing to flee, they would be more successful.

 

Application Question: Why is it so important to flee temptation instead of trying to faithfully endure it? What should we do when we can’t avoid it entirely?

 

To Conquer Temptation, We Must Be Willing to Pay the Cost

 

When she saw that he had left his outer garment in her hand and had run outside, she called for her household servants and said to them, “See, my husband brought in a Hebrew man to us to humiliate us. He tried to have sex with me, but I screamed loudly. When he heard me raise my voice and scream, he left his outer garment beside me and ran outside.” So she laid his outer garment beside her until his master came home. This is what she said to him: “That Hebrew slave you brought to us tried to humiliate me, but when I raised my voice and screamed, he left his outer garment and ran outside.” When his master heard his wife say, “This is the way your slave treated me,” he became furious. Joseph’s master took him and threw him into the prison, the place where the king’s prisoners were confined. So he was there in the prison.

Genesis 39:13-20

 

No doubt, Joseph was aware that scorning Potiphar’s wife could have hazardous consequences. Mrs. Potiphar quickly went from humiliation to rage—leading her to frame Joseph. She called all the servants together—declaring that the “Hebrew” that Potiphar brought to them came to humiliate them (v. 14). Not only was she declaring to the other slaves that Joseph was a threat, but she catered to their ethnic pride and fear of foreigners. The “Hebrew” would try to hurt them as well. Then she called Potiphar and by implication blamed him. She said, “that Hebrew slave you brought to us tried to humiliate me” (v. 17). Because of this, Potiphar threw Joseph into prison.

 

Interpretation Question: Did Potiphar believe his wife’s accusations?

 

With that said, there is circumstantial evidence within the text that Potiphar didn’t completely believe his wife. (1) When it says, he became “furious” (v. 19), it does not say that he became furious at Joseph. (2) Also, the consequence for adultery would normally be execution. However, Potiphar, though Pharaoh’s chief executioner, gave Joseph a lenient sentence—imprisonment. (3) Also, in Genesis 40:2-3, it appears that Joseph was imprisoned in a prison that was attached to Potiphar’s house. It says, “Pharaoh was enraged with his two officials, the cupbearer and the baker, so he imprisoned them in the house of the captain of the guard in the same facility where Joseph was confined.” The captain of the guard was probably still Potiphar. If Potiphar believed that Joseph really tried to rape his wife, he most likely would have sent him somewhere that he would never see again. (4). Finally, in Genesis 40:4, Potiphar entrusted Pharaoh’s prisoners to Joseph to care for. It says, “The captain of the guard appointed Joseph to be their attendant, and he served them.” Why would Potiphar entrust Joseph with anything again if he had broken the ultimate trust—trying to rape his wife? It is also clear that Joseph was overseeing all the prisoners under the warden (Gen 39:22), not just Pharaoh’s special prisoners. This scenario doesn’t seem likely if Potiphar believed his wife’s accusations.

 

When Joseph is imprisoned based on Mrs. Potiphar’s accusations, it seems it was more like Daniel being thrown in the lions’ den (Daniel 6). When the Persian king put Daniel in prison, he knew that Daniel was righteous and had been framed by the other administrators; however, he had to obey the law. Similarly, to not punish Joseph would have been an extreme loss of face for Potiphar and, obviously, would have further hurt his relationship with his wife. The circumstantial evidence seems to point to the fact that Potiphar believed Joseph was righteous—though he had to punish him in some manner.

 

With that said, Joseph was willing to pay the cost for maintaining his integrity—even if it meant imprisonment. This is the very reason many people fall into temptation. They don’t want to offend or lose someone who is tempting them (or leading them to areas where there is temptation)—whether business associates, friends, a boyfriend or girlfriend, or even family. Some don’t want to get skipped over for promotion or shunned at their workplace, so they compromise with their peers. Many aren’t willing to pay the price for being holy. The price could be loneliness, being made fun of, losing one’s job, or even losing one’s life.

 

What price do you have to pay in order to maintain holiness and conquer temptation?

 

Application Question: What are some common costs of maintaining our integrity and conquering temptation? How has God called you to at times pay a price for following God? In what ways, have you, at times, compromised out of fear of the cost?

 

To Conquer Temptation, We Must Trust that God’s Plans Are Better

 

But the Lord was with Joseph and showed him kindness. He granted him favor in the sight of the prison warden. The warden put all the prisoners under Joseph’s care. He was in charge of whatever they were doing. The warden did not concern himself with anything that was in Joseph’s care because the Lord was with him and whatever he was doing the Lord was making successful.

Genesis 39:21-23

 

Finally, while Joseph is imprisoned, God showed him great kindness. He gave him favor with the prison warden. The warden put all the prisoners under Joseph’s care. Everything that Joseph did prospered. This is an important reality that we must consider when tempted. Essentially, temptation always says that taking part in it will satisfy us and that the temptation is better than God’s will for us. It’s the same lie Satan told Eve. He essentially said, “God is lying to you. If you eat of the tree, you won’t die. You will be like God.” Similarly, Satan says, “Getting drunk will be lots of fun and it doesn’t hurt anybody!” He says, “Sex outside of marriage will only make you closer to your mate.” “Living with your girlfriend only makes sense. How else can you tell if you’re compatible for marriage? Also, you’ll save lots of money!” Satan always contradicts God’s will for our lives and tries to convince us that succumbing to temptation is better than following God’s way.

 

Therefore, in order to conquer temptation, we must trust God and what his Word says. Eve had to trust God to not succumb to temptation, and it’s the same for us. Even though Joseph had to suffer a cost for being holy—being put in prison—God was with him in the prison and blessed him. Also, as we’ll see later, Joseph needed to be put in prison in order to eventually interpret the dreams of Pharaoh and be exalted to second in command of Egypt. God’s plans, though mysterious and unpredictable, were good. Joseph just needed to trust them.

 

Are you willing to trust God even when things don’t make sense, when compromise seems an easier path? Are you willing to trust what God says about your trials—that he is using them for good? If not, you will eventually succumb to temptation and reap the consequences of it.

 

Application Question: If Satan is always tempting us to not trust God so that we’ll fall into sin, how can we increase our faith in God to stand?

 

Conclusion

 

How can we conquer temptation? We learn a great deal from Joseph’s triumphant example, as he faced multiple temptations as a slave and later a prisoner in Potiphar’s house.

 

  1. To Conquer Temptation, We Must Submit to God’s Discipline Instead of Becoming Bitter at It

  2. To Conquer Temptation, We Must Practice Integrity in All Areas of Life

  3. To Conquer Temptation, We Must Especially Guard Ourselves in Times of Success

  4. To Conquer Temptation, We Must Consider the Consequences

  5. To Conquer Temptation, We Must Recognize How Evil It Is

  6. To Conquer Temptation, We Must Avoid It Persistently

  7. To Conquer Temptation, We Must Be Willing to Pay the Cost

  8. To Conquer Temptation, We Must Trust that God’s Plans Are Better

 

Application Question: What are some other principles that will help us conquer temptation? In what ways is God calling you to further employ strategic principles to overcome temptation in general or a specific temptation?

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Guzik, D. (2013). Genesis (Ge 39:1). Santa Barbara, CA: David Guzik.

 

[2] Swindoll, Charles R. Joseph (p. 24). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition.

 

[3] Hughes, R. K. (2004). Genesis: beginning and blessing (p. 461). Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books.

 

[4] Swindoll, Charles (1998-12-03). Hand Me Another Brick (p. 98). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition.

 

[5] Swindoll, Charles (1998-12-03). Hand Me Another Brick (p. 98). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition.

 

 

[6] Guzik, D. (2013). Genesis (Ge 39:7–10). Santa Barbara, CA: David Guzik.

 

[7] Guzik, D. (2013). Genesis (Ge 39:7–10). Santa Barbara, CA: David Guzik.

 

[8] Hughes, R. K. (2004). Genesis: beginning and blessing (p. 464). Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books.

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